Suomeksi
 
 
Teaching programme

TAUGHT CLASSES 2017-2018

AUTUMN SEMESTER 2017
SPRING SEMESTER 2018

 

INDEPENDENT STUDY ELECTIVES

Classes offered every year

NAMS1111. Crossing the Atlantic: The Making of North America

(4 op/ECTS credits)
Teaching: Autumn semester. See Nettiopsu for more information. NB: Teaching starts on September 6 in lecture room XXI (Agora building)!
 
Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta
 
Objectives
After completing this class, the student should have a clear understanding of the process, context, and major demographic, cultural and political inputs and outcomes in the creation of a neo-European civilization in North America (the USA and Canada). Students should become critically aware of relevant sources of information in libraries and the internet, and familiar with the main historical outlines and major events, and with relevant political, cultural and ideological frames of reference for making sense of these.
 
Content
The course covers the history of North America and the Caribbean from the first European contacts to the present day. Key concepts addressed include: definitions of ‘North America’, and its regional geographies; its states, populations, and cultures, and the dynamics of their interaction; and the major historical phases and events.
 
Format
Lectures: 20 h (class contact), + textbook (Brescia & Super: North America: An Introduction), individual study + final written examination.
 
Language of instruction: English.
 
The class lasts the full Fall Semester (= Quarters 1 & 2).
 
Evaluation
By written final examination and individual study assignments.
On the scale 5 (high), 4, 3 (average), 2, 1 (weak).
 
Previous studies required
None

Registration
Nettiopsu.
Go to Courses -> Registration -> Faculty of Humanities -> School of Languages and Translation Studies -> choose the course and tick the box

See also NAMS1112 Crossing the Atlantic: Term Paper  

(4 op/ECTS credits)
Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta
 
Objectives
The student should have an understanding of the historical context and development of Canada as a sovereign state in North America, parallel to but distinct from the United States.
 
Content
Historical and geographical development of the neo-European society that became Canada, from its French and English (and Scottish) colonial origins to its present multicultural character. History and present state of contact with the aboriginal peoples. History and development of the Québec question. Assessment of the role and position of Canada in North America and the world today.
 
Format
Lectures: 28 h (class contact), individual study + final written examination. 
 
Language of instruction: English.
 
The class lasts the full spring semester (= Quarters 3 & 4).
 
Evaluation
By written final examination + classroom participation. Additional readings for the exam may be introduced during the course.
On the scale 5 (high), 4, 3 (average), 2, 1 (weak).
 
Previous studies required
NAMS1111. Crossing the Atlantic: The Making of North America for degree students. For international & exchange students no previous studies required.


Electives 

Independent Study Modules ("Book Exams")


NOTE: The following three modules are regularly available every year by independent study i.e. a "book exam". Contact the teacher responsible for the exam for a book list. (Please note: these are not taught classes).

NAMS1112. Crossing the Atlantic: Term Paper

(5 op/ECTS credits)
Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta
 
Objectives
In carrying out a Term Paper project, a student is expected to familiarize themselves with and explore a chosen topic within the frame of reference of North American studies, and specifically to examine how far the ‘Crossing the Atlantic’ paradigm is useful in explicating the chosen topic.
 
Scheduling
The Term Paper project is available parallel to the Crossing the Atlantic (NAMS1111) taught class, during the same semester. Subject to advance agreement with the examiner, it may also be undertaken at a later date by students who have completed the taught class.
 
Format
The student defines and investigates a topic within the frame of reference of North American studies, which has been approved in advance by the examiner, and writes a Term Paper of approximately 5000 words based on this research.
 
The Term Paper should be written in English unless a different language has explicitly been approved in advance by the examiner.
 
An introductory session will be held explaining the idea, expectations, and procedure protocol for the Term Paper. Thereafter, students will be given individual supervision as necessary. Term Papers should be submitted by the deadline, which is binding. Term Papers submitted late will be penalized by one grade for each week that they are late.
 
Evaluation
On the scale 5 (high), 4, 3 (average), 2, 1 (weak).
The Term Paper will be evaluated on the following criteria: clarity of the research design, selection and critical use of source materials, coherence of argumentation. Correctness of English will only be taken into consideration for students Majoring in or who are native speakers of English; for all other students, the relevant criterion will be the intelligibility of the writing.
 
Previous studies required
Parallel attendance at or previous completion of the taught class Crossing the Atlantic NAMS1111.
 

NAMS1102. Road Readings of the USA

(5 op/ECTS credits)
Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta
 
Objectives
In completing this independent reading and research assignment, students are expected to deepen their awareness and understanding of the vastness of the American space, the variety of its cultures, and the specificities of its regional landscapes and societies.
 
Format
Independent study. Introductory sessions at the beginning of each semester. Supervision available as necessary through individual consultations or by email.
 
All students study three different texts (or other materials deemed suitable by the examiner):
  • A) travel writing in book format: John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley;
  • B) travel blogs, road journals or various fictional representations of ‘being on the road’; and
  • C) an academic text dealing with the impact of travel and the movement of people and ideas, and the ways in which ideas of ‘America’ are shaped in the process.

Texts for slots B) and C) may be selected either from a list of recommended titles (contact the examiner), or suggested by the student and approved in advance by the examiner.

Available throughout the academic year.
 
Evaluation
By written examination.
On the scale 5 (high), 4, 3 (average), 2, 1 (weak).

 

NAMS2002 The Making of Canada: Term Paper

(5 op/ECTS credits)

Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta

Objectives

In carrying out a Term Paper project, a student is expected to familiarize themselves with and explore a chosen topic within Canadian social history.

Scheduling

The Term Paper project is available to students who have completed/are in the process of completing the taught course The Making of Canada (NAMS2001).

Format

The student defines and investigates a topic within Canadian social history, which has been approved in advance by the examiner, and writes a Term Paper of approximately 5000 words based on this research.

The Term Paper should be written in English unless a different language has explicitly been approved in advance by the examiner.

Students wishing to take this study unit must contact the person in charge for instructions before they start working on the project. Information is also available through the taught courses NAMS111 Crossing the Atlantic: Making of North America and NAMS2001 The Making of Canada. Students will be given individual supervision as necessary. Term Papers should be submitted by the deadline, which is binding.Term Papers submitted late will receive a lower grade. 

This is an independent study unit.

Evaluation

On the scale 5 (high), 4, 3 (average), 2, 1 (weak).

The Term Paper will be evaluated on the following criteria: clarity of the research design, selection and critical use of source materials, coherence of argumentation. Correctness of English will only be taken into consideration for students Majoring in or who are native speakers of English; for all other students, the relevant criterion will be the intelligibility of the writing.


NAMS2003 The Making of Canada: Readings

(5 op/ECTS credits)

Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta

Objectives
In completing this independent reading and research assignment, students are expected to deepen their awareness and understanding of Canadian social history.

Content
All students study three different texts (or other materials deemed suitable by the examiner) engaging the questions “What is Canada?” and “What makes it Canadian?”:

  • A) Robert Kroetsch: Alberta, pp. 1-50;

  • B) memoirs, fictions or other representations of Canadian history and society which address the variety of cultures, communities, of regional landscapes etc. within Canada; and

  • C) an academic text dealing with the making of Canada and the Canadian mindset.

Texts for slots B) and C) may be selected either from a list of recommended titles (contact the examiner), or suggested by the student and approved in advance by the examiner.

Format
Independent study. Supervision available as necessary through individual consultations or by email.

Available throughout the academic year.

Evaluation
By written examination. On the scale 5 (high), 4, 3 (average), 2, 1 (weak).


NAMS1051/YLHI0298 History of the USA

(5 or 6 op/ECTS credits) Readings + examination
The examination gives a total of 5/6 study points; short written essay-type answers are expected
 
The 5 ECTS exam includes one book (Takaki) and three articles specified below:
 
Takaki, Ronald, A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America 560 p. Publisher: Back Bay Books; Revised Edition (2008) ISBN-10: 0316022365 ISBN-13: 978-0316022361
 
The 6 ECTS exam includes two books (Jenkins, Kyvig) and three articles specified below:
 
Jenkins, Philip: A History of the United States, Third Edition 384 p. Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; Third edition (2007) ISBN-10: 0230506771 ISBN-13: 978-0230506770
 
Kyvig, David E., Daily Life in the United States, 1920-1940: How Americans Lived Throught eh Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression. 350 pages Publisher: Ivan R Dee (2004) ISBN-10: 1566635845 ISBN-13: 978-1566635844 Elektr. Book: Ebrary
 
The articles required for both the 5/6 ECTS exams are
  • Jonathan Zimmerman: Brown-ing the American Textbook. History, Psychology, and the Origins of Modern Multiculturalism. History of Education Quarterly Vol. 44 No. 1 Spring 2004, pp. 46-69.
  • Auvo Kostiainen: Interest in the History of Finnish Americans. Finns in the United States: A History of Settlement, Dissent, and Integration. Ed. Auvo Kostiainen. Michigan State University Press 2014, pp. 13-25.
  • Peter Kivisto: The Transnational Practices of Finnish Immigrants. Finns in the United States: A History of Settlement, Dissent, and Integration. Ed. Auvo Kostiainen. Michigan State University Press 2014, pp. 297-308.
 
Contact person
Pia Koivunen, Department of European and World History (Sirkkala campus) pia.koivunen[a]utu.fi
 
The exam is available on the Department of History exam dates.

NAMS1052 American Film

(8op/ECTS credits)
Contact person
Veijo Hietala, Media Studies (Sirkkala campus)
veijo.hietala[at]utu.fi

Evaluation
Readings + examination

Teaching methods
In the academic year 2017-2018, this study unit is available as a taught course Hollywood Genres by Veijo Hietala in period III (January-February 2018). The independent study unit is only available as an alternative to the taught course. NAMS1052 is an independent study project, not a taught course.

Study materials
Please consult the examiner.
 
Note: Registering for the previous two exams must be done in the relevant departments (History & Media Studies, respectively). The exams must be taken on the exam dates of the department in question.

 

NAMS1070 - NAMS1089 DVD Study Units (2+2 op)

These sets of video recordings of lecture series by leading American scholars, with supporting material, are published by The Teaching Company, and have been generously donated to the NAMS program by the US Embassy.
 
They may be loaned from the Office of the Department of English for 2 weeks. Students may then take a written exam on the topic, for 2 op, AND/OR choose to write a research paper also for 2 op.
 

Following DVD units are available:

  •  The American Civil War 1-4, Gary W. Gallagher, University of Virginia
  • Civil Liberties and the Bill of Rights 1-3, John E. Finn, Wesleyan University
  • Abraham Lincoln: In His Own Words 1&2, David Zafersky, Northwestern University
  • Tocqueville and the American Experiment 1&2, William R. Cook, State University of New York
  • The American Revolution 1&2, Allen C. Guelzo, Gettysburg College
  • The History of the Supreme Court 1-3, Peter Irons, University of California
  • Emerson, Thoreau, and the Transcendentalist Movement 1&2, Ashton Nichols, Dickinson College
  • The Great Debate: Advocates and Opponents of the American Constitution, Thomas L. Pangle, The University of Texas
  • Elements of Jazz: From Cakewalks to Fusion, Bill Messenger, Peabody Conservatory of Music
  • American Religious History 1&2, Patrick N. Allitt, Emory University 
Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta
 

North America Residency (3/5 op)

Contact person
Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta
 
The students should improve their language skills in languages spoken in North America and/or gain a deeper understanding of North American cultures through spending a consecutive period of at least four (4) weeks in one or more North American countries.
 
After the visit, students write a report in English, exploring their experiences during the visit. A brief itinerary of the trip and documentation proving the visit should be provided, but the report should focus on, for example
- experiences of working, studying etc in a foreign language context
- challenges to the student's previous understanding of North American societies and their peoples
- the impact of the visit on the student's continuing studies at their home university
  
Minimum 4 week residency: 3 ECTS
Minimum 8 week residency: 5 ECTS
North America Residency can be included in the NAMS Intermediate Studies package only.
 
Instructions for writing the report are available here.
 

Final Project

NAMS3001 Interdisciplinary Project  (10 op)

Contact person

Elina Siltanen, Department of English, Rosetta 

By completing this Project, the student (or students, in the case of a joint Project) demonstrate their ability to define a coherent and feasible research project, within the frame of reference of North American Studies, which can be insightfully approached from the perspective of more than one intersecting scholarly or scientific disciplines. They are expected to carry out both the design and the execution of the research project essentially independently, ie: to identify a feasible interdisciplinary project, to set out  its research design clearly and convincingly, to identify what sources they will need to use for their data and other information and to use and evaluate these sources critically, to implement the research design, and to write a clear and coherent research report on their findings.
 
Content
For this project, intended for persons who already have a wide background in North American Studies, students propose a North American research topic of their own choice which involves a multidisciplinary approach. Group projects, involving more than one student, are warmly encouraged.
 
Obligatory for students completing the Intermediate Level (25+35 op) in North American Studies.
 
Available throughout the academic year.
 
Procedure
Presentation of a research design for approval; its implementation and reporting in a written paper (no less than 6000 words).
 
The Interdisciplinary Project will be evaluated on the following criteria: clarity of the research design, selection and critical use of source materials, coherence of argumentation. The paper should be written in good English, and should be language-edited if necessary before submission.
 
The Interdisciplinary Project should normally be the last unit carried out by a student before completing the upper phase in North American Studies (25+35op).
 
International and exchange students will only be allowed to undertake the Interdisciplinary Project if they already have previously completed an extensive range of relevant studies.
 
Previous studies required
Extensive studies in or highly relevant to North American Studies: usually approximately 40-50 op (40-50 ECTS credits).
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