Press release

Sex Differences in Personality Traits in Asian Elephants

11.03.2019

Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that male and female Asian elephants differ in their personality. Previous work on a timber elephant population from Myanmar has shown that Asian elephants have three personality factors: Attentiveness, Sociability and Aggressiveness. The new study demonstrates that male elephants score higher on the Aggressiveness trait than females, whereas female elephants score higher on the Sociability trait than males.

University of Turku Celebrates 99th Anniversary

04.03.2019

The University of Turku had its 99th Anniversary Celebration on 28 February. At the event, Editor-in-chief Ville Pernaa was awarded as the Alumni of the Year. In addition, Rector Kalervo Väänänen highlighted the autonomy of academic education and degree system in his speech.

Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy Increases Risk of ADHD among Offspring up to 3-fold

26.02.2019

The higher the cotinine levels were in the mother’s blood during pregnancy, the greater was the child’s risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later in life, showed an epidemiological study conducted by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku. Globally, it is the first study in which the connection between fetal nicotine exposure and diagnosis of ADHD was shown by measuring cotinine levels from pregnant maternal serum specimens.

Tanzania's Preparation for Climate Risks Supported by Collaboration between University of Turku and Four Local Universities

14.02.2019

The World Bank is funding the University of Turku and four Tanzanian universities in developing geospatial expertise to control risks posed by floods and climate change. Cities in Tanzania are especially vulnerable to the extreme phenomena caused by climate change due to population growth and weak urban planning.

Modern Mahouts Taking Care of Elephants in Myanmar Are Younger And Less Experienced

11.02.2019

Traditional elephant handling worldwide is rapidly changing. Researchers from the University of Turku in Finland and Myanma Timber Enterprise (MTE) veterinarians found mahouts in Myanmar are only 22 years old on average, with an average experience of three years working with elephants, and they are changing elephants yearly preventing the development of long-term bonds between elephants and mahouts. These shifts contrast the traditional elephant-keeping system of skills being accumulated over a lifetime of working with the same elephant before being taught to the younger generation.