Keyword: Climate change

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University of Turku leads new doctoral training project focused on green and digital transition with €7.4 million in EU funding

19.10.2023

The University of Turku has received €3.3 million in EU funding for a doctoral training project that responds to the current need for experts by training 25 doctoral researchers from fields related to green and digital transition.

Fish swimming exercises can improve their ability to tolerate global warming (Dissertation: MSc Luca Pettinau, 8.9.2023, biology)

A Doctoral Researcher Luca Pettinau examined whether the heart performance of fish in fish farms can be enhanced with swimming exercises. Regular swimming exercises with moderate exertion improved the heart performance of the fish, as well as their ability to tolerate higher temperatures. Increasing the strain on adult fish also improved the growth and survival of their offspring.

Current marine heat waves could increase short-term resistance of fish towards warm waters, but this capacity might be damaged by long-term temperature increase with climate change in Baltic Sea (Dissertation defense: MSc Giovanna Mottola, 30.9.2022, animal physiology)

After conducting a research on fish populations in the Baltic sea,  Doctoral Candidate MSc Giovanna Mottola found that some fish can still survive from current summer heat waves. But according to the research the general increase of temperature due to climate change all the year around can threaten this capacity.

Protected Areas Help Waterbirds Adapt to Climate Change

21.10.2020

Climate change pushes species distribution areas northward. However, the expansion of species ranges is not self-evident due to e.g. habitat degradation and unsustainable harvesting caused by human activities. A new study led from the University of Turku suggests that protected areas can facilitate wintering waterbird adaptation to climate warming by advancing their range shifts towards north.

Amazonian Soils Mapped Using Indicator Species

17.04.2019

Understanding the ecology and distributions of species in Amazonia is hampered by lack of information about environmental conditions, such as soils. Plant occurrence data are typically more abundant than soil samples in poorly known areas, and researchers from Finland and Brazil have now developed a method that uses both plant and soil data to produce a map of soil properties.